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Episode 079: Navel Gazing on a Boulder

Episode 079: Navel Gazing on a Boulder

| October 10, 2016

I’m not sure where any of this is going, but we’ll see.

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Episode 078: Potatoes and the Entangled Subject of Writing

Episode 078: Potatoes and the Entangled Subject of Writing

| May 26, 2016

I attempt to sort out the entangled subjects of writing and potatoes. I analyze a clip of writer Steven Johnson talking with Kerri Miller about how potatoes were at the center of a turning point in writer Michael Pollan’s career. Pollan greatly influenced Johnson and his book The Botany of Desire, which devotes a chapter to potatoes, changed not only the way we look at food in America, but also the way we see ourselves as food writers. I draw on the new materialism of Karen Barad to help theorize methods of tracing entanglements practiced by many contemporary popular and academic writers. Read the show notes for more information.

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Episode 077: The Whole Burrito: Chipotle, Micro(be)politics, Sick Days, and Social Justice

Episode 077: The Whole Burrito: Chipotle, Micro(be)politics, Sick Days, and Social Justice

| February 27, 2016

To understand the rhetoric around Chipotle’s outbreaks of foodborne illness, you have to unwrap the whole burrito. “Episode 077: The Whole Burrito: Chipotle, Micro(be)politics, Sick Days, and Social Justice” So many of you know that I wrote a dissertation that looked at—among other food issues—the history of the burrito and Chipotle Mexican Grill’s use of […]

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Episode 076: Burning Clean and Even: Rhetorical Convection and Expert Barbecue Talk

Episode 076: Burning Clean and Even: Rhetorical Convection and Expert Barbecue Talk

| October 11, 2015

I return after a bit of a hiatus to talk about the way we talk about barbecue. I do a rhetorical analysis of Christopher Kimball’s conversation with pitmaster Aaron Franklin to uncover the nuances in expressions of expertise in a topic with a lot of ambiguity.

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Sandor Katz at the Austin Fermentation Festival

Sandor Katz at the Austin Fermentation Festival

| March 17, 2015

Back in November of last year, I went to the Austin Fermentation Festival put on by Texas Farmers Market. I didn’t bring in my recording equipment and I was standing in the overflow area, which was really just a concrete hallway. Suffice it to say the recording is terrible: That said, I transcribed most of […]

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Listen to more about Cereal Rhetorics

Listen to more about Cereal Rhetorics

| January 3, 2015

If you liked the episode on “Cereal Rhetorics,” then you might love the TBTL on Serial/Cereal. If you didn’t listen to the “Cereal Rhetorics” episode, you can listen here.

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Episode 075: Mise en Place

Episode 075: Mise en Place

| November 14, 2014

Cooking is not always the hard part of cooking. Sometimes getting your mind right is the hardest part. Getting your space right can be the hardest part. Getting to a state of mind where you can see such work as a joy can be difficult. But if you have negotiated with those around you to be the cook or share the cooking responsibilities, mise en place can help.

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Episode 074: The Family Meal

Episode 074: The Family Meal

| October 8, 2014

I spent the better part of a day making sweet potato crêpes so that my CSA sweet potatoes didn’t go to waste. I often ask myself on days like these if I wouldn’t have been better off, say, chucking the potatoes in the freezer, buying some store bought crêpes and playing with my son for a couple hours.

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Episode 073: Peking Duck and Diplomacy

Episode 073: Peking Duck and Diplomacy

| September 15, 2014

Why would the Nixon administration and the Chinese government put so much emphasis on food during Nixon’s Historic trip to China? Well, a newspaper article from the time alludes to the fact that President Johnson signed an immigration reform bill that outlawed quotas in 1965. This changed the demographics on the East Coast and the West Coast. So the U.S. was getting an influx of Chinese immigrants and China was again becoming a major trading partner with the U.S. So the governments of both countries needed to build goodwill among citizens. They needed to get everyone on board to smooth out the cultural exchange that was about to take place. For decades before this, Americans did not see much of Chinese culture coming into the U.S. and diplomatic relations between the two countries were kind of strained. So images broadcast from the Nixon trip signaled the emergence of new lines of communication that were lubricated with food and drink.

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Episode 072: Cereal Rhetorics

Episode 072: Cereal Rhetorics

| August 11, 2014

What you thought was just a breakfast food is actually a network made up of the performative citationality of brand symbols. I wonder if that is what David Chang and Christina Tosi of Momofuku Milk Bar were thinking when they TMed their cereal milk.

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Episode 071: Kale, Sociality, and the Blender

Episode 071: Kale, Sociality, and the Blender

| August 1, 2014 | 0 Comments

In the spirit of combining food, rhetoric, and technology, I want to talk about kale, sociality, and the blender. More precisely, I’m going to listen to a few other people talk about these things.

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Episode 070: Answers to the Queso Question

Episode 070: Answers to the Queso Question

| February 20, 2014

“Episode 070: Answers to the Queso Question” Will goes down another rabbit hole filled with queso. This time, however, he emerges with four answers to the queso question. (Or, how to make queso without Velveeta.)

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