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Manning Up in the Kitchen

Manning Up in the Kitchen

| October 22, 2013

I used to pat myself on the back (a lot) for being a man who did the grocery shopping, cleaned the kitchen, and cooked for his wife every day. I did this for more than a decade. (We’ve been married 13 years.) I thought I was a hip, equality-minded dude. But I was wrong for […]

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Script for Episode 066: Michael Pollan, The Genre

Script for Episode 066: Michael Pollan, The Genre

| October 9, 2013

Michael Pollan at Yale. Image courtesy of Ragesoss on Wikimedia. Hey, Folks. I’ve got to get home to make dinner, so I’m going to try to keep this quick. I’ve been going back over Michael Pollan’s oeuvre lately. I’ve been following him since Botany of Desire. I’ve followed the Michael Pollan imitators and the Michael […]

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Fighting the Voltron of Food

Fighting the Voltron of Food

| September 12, 2013 | 2 Comments

At the same time it was engaged in an anti-obesity campaign, the USDA was also helping Domino’s Pizza develop a new line of pizzas with 40% more cheese so that it could sell back to consumers the surplus milkfat that resulted in American’s shift toward reduced fat milk. Enough consumers, purchasing as individuals at the grocery store, made “healthy choices” about milk that it shifted the dairy landscape. The USDA responded by putting the milkfat back into splurge foods like pizza. Buy whole milk and diligently make homemade food every night or buy skim milk and get a pizza on a Friday night. Either way, the dairy industry will get your money and cram milkfat down your cheese hole.

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“My Conversion from Religion to Chocolate”

“My Conversion from Religion to Chocolate”

| May 29, 2013

“When I was approached to write about my experience as a craft chocolate maker, it was suggested that since I had a B.A. in Religious Studues, ‘spirituality and chocolate’ might be a relevant approach. Yet, though I knew that there were plenty of real world cases where chocolate and religion converged, I was unenthusiastic about the topic.”

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“Menu Literacy”

“Menu Literacy”

| May 21, 2013

Think about chicken as a menu item. It is not the same thing as a real, live chicken. It may be roasted or fried. It may be seasoned 100 different ways and prepared by 100 different traditions. It may be pumped full of hormones and antibiotics or it might be free-range and fed a diet of sheep’s milk, soy and hazelnuts. The menu may say one thing, and you may be served another.

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“The Erotic Pleasures of Danger Foods”

“The Erotic Pleasures of Danger Foods”

| May 21, 2013

As is evidenced by the quotes within quotes, the notion that sex and food are linked is common, from the realm of pop cultural diet trends to the realm of high theory. But as the last line suggests, it’s not just sex-as-in-intercourse or sex-as-pleasure but also sex-as-in-identity that is at stake.

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“The Urban Food Database and the Pedagogy of Attunement”

“The Urban Food Database and the Pedagogy of Attunement”

| May 20, 2013

In “The Urban Food Database and the Pedagogy of Attunement” Jody Nicotra points out that food discourse is enjoying a social and political heyday. Nicotra’s piece itself exhibits a bit of this acquisitive strategy, this database logic. It pairs nicely with David Harvey’s “he Body as Accumulation Strategy,” which I arrived at via Laruen Berlant’s “Slow Death (Sovereignty, Obesity, Lateral Agency),” which I arrived at via another chapter in this volume, Jenny Rice’s (Un)Lovable Food. But it is not just the logic of the database that Nicotra is talking about. That is, the database is not merely an apt metaphor. It is the underlying technology that makes possible such a movement as “freeganism.”

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“Counterintuitive: How the Marketing of Modernism Hijacked the Kitchen Stove”

“Counterintuitive: How the Marketing of Modernism Hijacked the Kitchen Stove”

| May 16, 2013

In the article “Counterintuitive: How the Marketing of Modernism Hijacked the Kitchen Stove” in From Betty Crocker to Feminist Food Studies: Critical Perspectives on Women and Food,Leslie Land writes about how the aesthetic of the continuous kitchen counter and smooth sleek lines transformed the kitchen into a more “designed” though less functional space. I suppose […]

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“Woman Under Siege: Leningrad 1941-1942”

“Woman Under Siege: Leningrad 1941-1942”

| May 15, 2013

“During theGerman siege of Leningrad, which lasted for nearly nine hundred days, over one million people died of starvation and related causes; nearly 200,000 died in February alone. The resourceful womean of Leningrad painstakingly retrieved old flour dust from the cracks in the floorboards and licked decades of spattered grease from the kitchen walls, savoring it slowly. (144) “

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“Consuming Iowa, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Earl Butz”

“Consuming Iowa, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Earl Butz”

| May 14, 2013

Recipes are a good example of how mimesis operates in relation to food. Recipes are cultural representations of real food. It is a commonplace to talk about how recipes passed down through generations are a way of maintaining traditions and cultures in families and larger social units. But as quaint as bequeathing recipes is, there are also more calculated deployments of recipes. Corporations have a long history of deploying recipes in the form of corporate cookbooks to sell their products.

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“The Organic Libertarian”

“The Organic Libertarian”

| May 13, 2013

I think this is the first time I’ve been in total agreement with the “Come and Take It” set.

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“Love in the Time of Global Warming”

“Love in the Time of Global Warming”

| May 10, 2013

The story itself is simple; it has to do with a guy who really likes yogurt he gets at the farmers merket. But what it does with genre is a bit more complicated. As suggested above, Stern mixes research, fiction, rhetoric, and a little bit of psychoanalysis for good measure. But the little bit of psychoanalysis is really what the piece seems to be all about. He writes, merely, “I was suffering from what Žižek as a diagnostician, might call surplus-jouissance.

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